Christina Batteate

Christina’s immersion in creating sustainable urban environments spans the last decade and globe, including work on housing, transportation and food systems in North and South America. A student of urban planning and practitioner of public health, Christina’s career functions at the intersection of two increasingly interdependent disciplines. She earned her Bachelor of Science in City and Regional Planning from California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo and joint Masters degrees in Public Health and Latin American Studies from UCLA. She currently contributes to a variety of projects addressing environmental health in the fields of transportation, agriculture and decision-science. In her role as Outreach Coordinator for COEH, she manages web and social media presence, curates videos and articles, hosts bi-annual educational symposia, and helps to connect the research, service and training of COEH to the general public.

Richard J. Jackson

Richard Jackson is a Professor at the Fielding School of Public Health at the University of California, Los Angeles. A pediatrician, he has served in many leadership positions in both environmental health and infectious disease with the California Health Department, including the highest as the State Health Officer.  For nine years he was Director of the CDC’s NationalCenter for Environmental Health in Atlanta and received the Presidential Distinguished Service award.  In October, 2011 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences.

While in California he was instrumental in conceptualizing laws to reduce risks from pesticides, especially to farm workers and to children. While at CDC he was a national and international leader, including leading the federal effort to “biomonitor” chemical levels in the US population.  He has received the Breast Cancer Fund’s Hero Award, as well as Lifetime Achievement Awards fromthe Public Health Law Association, and the New Partners for Smart Growth.  In October, 2012 he received the John Heinz Award for Leadership in the Environment.

Dick Jackson co-authored two Island Press Books: Urban Sprawl and Public Health in 2004 and Making Healthy Places in 2011. He is host of a 2012 public television series Designing Healthy Communities which links to the J Wiley & Sons book by the same name.  He has served on many environmental and health boards, as well as the Board of Directors of the American Institute of Architects. He is an elected honorary member of both the American Institute of Architects and the American Society of Landscape Architects.

David Eisenman

David Eisenman, MD, MSHS, is an associate professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and has a joint appointment at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health where he directs the Center for Public Health and Disasters. Dr. Eisenman is also an Associate Natural Scientist at RAND. Dr. Eisenman lives and surfs in Marina del Rey, California.

Ondine S. von Ehrenstein

I specialise in global reproductive, perinatal and child health, including birth outcomes, neurodevelopment, autism, cognition, and asthma. My work emphasizes the life-course approach, focusing on the early life period as it sets the stage for life long health. My research involves large population studies to examine linkages between prenatal and early life environmental, lifestyle and community factors, and reproductive, childhood and population health. My current research takes place internationally and in California. The overarching aim of my work is creating population based evidence that can impact policies and translate into community based prevention.

Timothy Malloy

Timothy Malloy teaches Environmental Aspects of Business Transactions, Regulatory Lawyering, Regulation of the Business Firm, Environmental Policy and Politics, and Contracts. With Dr. John Froines of the School of Public Health, Malloy is Faculty Director of the interdisciplinary UCLA Sustainable Technology and Policy Program. After receiving his law degree, Professor Malloy clerked for Judge Donald W. VanArtsdalen of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. He joined the UCLA faculty in 1998, after spending a combined 11 years in practice at private firms and at the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Region III. Professor Malloy’s research interests focus on environmental, chemical and nanotechnology policy, regulatory policy, and organizational theory and decision analysis, with particular emphasis on the relationship between regulatory design and implementation and the structure of business organizations. In addition, he has worked and written extensively in the area of risk governance and prevention-based regulation, melding together his academic interests with his work in the Sustainable Technology Policy Program.

Yifang Zhu

Dr. Yifang Zhu is a Professor of the Environmental Health Sciences Department in UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.  She graduated from Tsinghua University in 1997 and received her Ph.D. in Environmental Health Sciences from UCLA in 2003.  Her research interest is primarily in the field of air pollution, environmental exposure assessment, and aerosol science and technology.  Specifically, she is interested in quantitative exposure/risk assessments on ultrafine particles from various indoor and outdoor sources.  Her current research focuses on measuring and modeling ultrafine particle emissions, transport, and transformation on and near roadways as well as in various indoor environments.  Her scholarship and creativity has been recognized by several national awards, including the Walter A. Rosenblith New Investigator Award from the Health Effects Institute in 2007, the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation in 2009, and the Haagen-Smit Prize from Atmosphere Environment in 2011. Dr. Zhu was appointed to California Air Resource Board (CARB)’s Research Screening Committee in January 2014.

Wendie Robbins

“Diet is biobehavioral—it involves both biology and behavior. We’re looking at how diet affects infertility. For some couples, changes in diet might replace their need to pursue expensive assisted reproductive technologies. That would really be something.”

Professor Robbins has been a faculty member at UCLA since 1997. She shares an appointment between the School of Nursing and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, Environmental Health Sciences Department. As a member of the Center for Occupational and Environmental Health she has focused her research, teaching and service in the areas of epidemiology, male reproductive health, and occupational/environmental health nursing. Her research couples epidemiologic methods with laboratory-based science, for example, sperm DNA integrity measures related to male reproductive function.

Shane Que Hee

Professor of Environmental Health Sciences (EHS) and a faculty member of the UCLA Center for Occupational and Environmental Health (COEH), came to the Department in 1989 from the University of Cincinnati where he had been Assistant and Associate Professor since 1978. As of the end of 2010, he had 161 peer-reviewed publications including 126 in peer-reviewed journals, 25 book chapters, 4 books, six EPA criteria documents,134 national & international meeting presentations, and 46 keynote addresses at international and national meetings. In addition, he has had 41 grants awarded as Principal Investigator at UCLA. He has organized 13 scientific roundtables and symposia at national and international meetings. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Chemists and the American Industrial Hygiene Association. He formed the first national committee for risk assessment of skin absorbed chemicals. He reviews for many journals, and many government agencies. He has been a member of TOXNET, the NIOSH Board of Advisors, and currently reviews for the National Toxicology Program.