Changing the Landscape: People, Parks, and Power

The park equity movement in the U.S. is at a turning point. Parks and other green spaces are crucial for the health and wellbeing of communities—a fact made even clearer during the pandemic. But not all communities have access to these vital resources. Correcting inequities demands advocates’ utmost attention, urgency, and action. A new approach to achieving park equity can unlock transformation and usher in an era in which African American, Latino, and low-income urban communities are fair, just, and green.

Across the U.S., a growing number of jurisdictions are adopting park and green space equity policies. But in many low-income communities of color, longstanding green space inequities still remain. A growing movement of park equity advocates—including community members exercising their own power— is working to change that. In the new paper, Changing the Landscape: People, Parks, and Power, Prevention Institute and Alessandro Rigolon of the University of Utah propose an approach to park and green space equity that prioritizes investing in the capacity of people closest to the problem so that they can drive policy and systems changes that will achieve population-level impacts.

Key takeaways of Changing the Landscape: People, Parks, and Power are below. Please join us for a free webinar to learn about these points in more depth and hear an update on the planning of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s new national funding initiative for park and green space equity.

Speakers:

  • Elva Yañez, Director of Health Equity, Prevention Institute
  • Manal J. Aboelata, Deputy Executive Director, Prevention Institute
  • Rachel Bennett, Program Manager, Prevention Institute
  • Alessandro Rigolon, Assistant Professor, University of Utah, Department of City & Metropolitan Planning

On this webinar, participants will learn about how:

  • Urban parks and green spaces protect public health and help mitigate the impacts of climate change.
  • African Americans, Latinos, and people who live in low-income, urban neighborhoods have less access to parks and green spaces than people who live in more affluent or predominantly white communities.
  • These inequities are the product of policies and practices like residential segregation, redlining, racially biased planning decisions, and exclusionary zoning, as well as problematic narratives and ways of working in the green space field that have often excluded or tokenized communities of color.
  • The traditional approach to addressing these inequities has focused on developing new parks or green infrastructure projects or improving existing projects. While project development is crucial, a sole focus on individual projects fails to address the existing system that produces—and will continue to produce—green space inequities.
  • To address the root causes of green space inequities, the parks and green space field should embrace upstream policy and systems change.
  • Power drives policy and systems change. Investing in community power building is key to achieving green space equity.
  • A growing number of jurisdictions across the U.S. are adopting park and green space equity policies. These include public finance measures that have an equity focus, park agency organizational changes, documentation of green space needs and inequities, joint use policies for school yards, land use policies that facilitate access to green space, policies and ordinances requiring community engagement for park development, and anti-displacement provisions within green space equity initiatives.
  • By embracing the approach described in Changing the Landscape: People, Parks, and Power, community residents, advocates, and jurisdictions can solve pervasive, structural inequities and support healthy, vibrant communities.

 

Support for this paper was provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

*Photo credit: Office of Los Angeles County Supervisor Hilda Solis

Protecting Frontline & Essential Workers from COVID-19

Register at http://bit.ly/PHcouncils

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed vulnerabilities for frontline, low-wage, and immigrant workers across a variety of industries and sectors. Although occupational exposures have been suspected of driving high rates of COVID-19 infections and deaths in many communities, Los Angeles has been one of the few counties in the U.S. to make detailed data on worksite outbreaks publicly available — and to adopt innovative worker-led measures to promote COVID-19 safety at workplaces in highly impacted sectors.

 

This webinar will examine the impacts of COVID-19 among frontline and essential workers in Los Angeles County and will discuss a Public Health Councils initiative that brings together worker organizations, public health department representatives, and academic partners to support workers in monitoring and enforcement of COVID-related health officer orders. Presenters will describe how the program came about and ongoing program efforts to support workers in forming public health councils at their worksites. They will also consider lessons learned from this groundbreaking initiative that can serve as a model to inform similar worker-led measures even beyond the pandemic.

 

CEU available for ABIH, REHS, BRN, and BCSP. Webinar participants seeking CEUs will be able to:

  • Describe characteristics of workplace COVID-19 outbreaks in Los Angeles County.
  • Comprehend functioning of worker-led Public Health Councils model.
  • Identify COVID-19 risk factors and preventive measures for frontline and essential workers.

 

Please contact coeh@ph.ucla.edu with any questions.

 

Dying for Work? Evidence and Implications of Cardiovascular Disease and Long Working Hours

Jian Li, MD, PhD, Dr.rer.sec

Professor of Work and Health, Department of Environmental Health Sciences
Fielding School of Public Health, School of Nursing, University of California Los Angeles

Tuesday, May 11th 2021
12:00 PM EST

Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83881881701?pwd=ckFPOXYzcGl0SFpTcSt5b2xXeGJrdz09

Meeting ID: 838 8188 1701
Passcode: Feinstein

Image of Dr. Jian Li

Dr. Li’s research interests include the measurement of psychosocial work characteristics, the health effects of work stress, and nursing and health, particularly involving epidemiology and intervention evaluation. Before his appointment at UCLA in 2019, he had been working in China and Germany with extensive experience on occupational health. He is an active member of the International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH) Scientific Committees on Cardiology in Occupational Health and Work Organization and Psychosocial Factors, and a member of the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) Cancer, Reproductive, Cardiovascular and Other Chronic Disease Prevention (CRC) Cross-Sector Council. During 2006-2010, Dr. Li received three Early Career Awards from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and other international research societies. He has published more than 160 scientific articles in peer-reviewed journals.

If you would like to meet with Dr. Li, please contact Vincenza Caruso (vcaruso2@northwell.edu) by May 7th.

This event is hosted by Jacqueline Moline, MD, MSc, and Grace Sembajwe, DSc, MSc, CIH
Department of Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention

 

Non-Tailpipe Emissions: Impacts on Urban Air Quality & Health

There’s still time to register for an exciting lineup of scientific sessions as part of HEI’s 2021 Virtual Annual Conference, a series of webinars, with topics covering a variety of important issues in air pollution and public health. Registration is free of charge.

 

Join us for the sixth session, Non-Tailpipe Emissions: Impacts on Urban Air Quality and Health, on May 11, 2021. Below you’ll find the full schedule of the remaining webinars.

Webinar Series Agenda

Tuesday, May 11, 10 AM-Noon ET 

Non-tailpipe Emissions: Impacts on Urban Air Quality and Health

With reductions in tailpipe emissions from motor vehicles, there is increasing interest in non-tailpipe emissions. Join us as we discuss current and likely future contributions of non-tailpipe emissions to ambient air concentrations, exposures, and health effects.

 

Thursday, May 13, 10 AM-Noon ET 

Early Career Researcher Spotlight 

Meet the new generation of air pollution and health researchers, this year’s winners of the Jane Warren Trainee Conference Award.

 

Tuesday, May 25, 10 AM-Noon ET 

What We Have Learned about Effects on Health at Low Levels of Exposure: Evidence from the United States, Canada, and Europe

This session will present results from recently completed HEI studies on health effects at low levels of air pollution, focusing on dose-response functions, multi-pollutant models, and strategies for confounder control.

Missed a webinar? Slides and recordings will be available on our website.

Discovering the Root of Your Back Story: Understanding and Preventing Back Injuries

About the webinar:

Back injuries are one of the most common forms of farm-related injuries. Protecting the back is vital for producers to stay active on the farm. Men and women are both prone to work-related back pain, with the first episode typically occurring between the ages of 20 and 40. This webinar will focus on effects of whole body vibration (WBV), causes of back injuries/pain, and how to prevent back injuries/pain.

Learning Objectives:

At the completion of this activity, the learner will be able to:

– Identify causes of back injuries/pain specific to agricultural work
– Describe strategies to prevent back injuries/pain in agricultural workers
– Describe effects of whole body vibration (WBV) when driving large machinery often used in agriculture
– Identify ways to manage chronic pain safely in the work environment

Accessibility:

If you require an accommodation for effective communication (ASL interpreting/CART captioning, alternative media formats, etc.) to fully participate in this event, please contact Michelle Meyer at (510) 642-8365 or with as much advance notice as possible and at least 7-10 days in advance of the event.

Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety

Chemical Exposures and Reproductive Health of Nail Technicians

About the webinar:

Nail technicians represent an under-studied occupation in terms of health and safety. Current research in this area will be presented, including chemical exposure measurements, reproductive health surveys, and future goals for community engagement.

Learning Objectives:

At the completion of this activity, the learner will be able to:

– Review the chemical exposure potential in the nail industry
– Identify the potential reproductive health issues these workers might face
– Discuss needs for future research in the nail industry

Accessibility:

If you require an accommodation for effective communication (ASL interpreting/CART captioning, alternative media formats, etc.) to fully participate in this event, please contact Michelle Meyer at (510) 642-8365 or with as much advance notice as possible and at least 7-10 days in advance of the event.

University of Utah Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Intensive Care Unit Nurses: Findings of a Concept Analysis

About the webinar:

Intensive care unit nurses are at increased risk of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, due to their stressful work environment. The disorder of PTSD, often thought of as affecting soldiers who have fought in war, has changed over time with new knowledge. Findings from a conceptual analysis using the Walker and Avant method provide clarification for healthcare professionals and hospital stakeholders to better understand PTSD as it pertains to ICU nurses and its impact on their lives, patient care, and healthcare organizations.

Learning Objectives:

At the completion of this activity, the learner will be able to:

– Review the conceptual definition of PTSD in ICU nurses from trauma experienced in the workplace
– Identify attributes, antecedents, and consequences of PTSD in ICU nurses and the negative impact on the nurse, patients, and the healthcare organization
– Discuss the implications of these research findings on occupational health practice

Accessibility:

If you require an accommodation for effective communication (ASL interpreting/CART captioning, alternative media formats, etc.) to fully participate in this event, please contact Michelle Meyer at (510) 642-8365 or with as much advance notice as possible and at least 7-10 days in advance of the event.

An Investigation of Home Ergonomics Issues Experienced by University Faculty and Students Due to COVID-19

About the webinar:

As millions of workers have shifted to telework, poor static postures may increase the risk of significant discomfort and potentially more serious musculoskeletal disorders. This webinar will explore results from a survey sent to University of Cincinnati faculty, staff, and administrators about home office ergonomics and discomfort. Many of the participants reported moderate to severe discomfort, laptops were widely used with most using the laptop monitor, and less than 45% of seating conditions were reported as having adjustable arm rests. As teleworking in makeshift offices becomes more common, special accommodations for workers, including the provision of ergonomic equipment, may be required to mitigate risk, prevent injury, and optimize worker performance.

Learning Objectives:

At the completion of this activity, the learner will be able to:

– Describe the relationship between office space design and potential musculoskeletal disorder outcomes
– Review correlations between office equipment selections and self-reported levels of discomfort in various portions of the body
– Discuss office design recommendations and economical alternatives to improve posture

Accessibility:

If you require an accommodation for effective communication (ASL interpreting/CART captioning, alternative media formats, etc.) to fully participate in this event, please contact Michelle Meyer at (510) 642-8365 or with as much advance notice as possible and at least 7-10 days in advance of the event.

University of Cincinnati ERC

Managing Stress and Building Resilience Among School Employees

About the webinar:

While some levels of stress can have benefits in motivation, chronic workplace stress causes overwhelm and can erode personal health. The COVID-19 pandemic has increased levels of workplace stress significantly for school employees. This webinar teaches you about the effects of workplace stress on your body, how to identify the root causes and develop short and long term strategies to make positive change. Learn how to choose healthy responses to stressful events to cope more effectively with demanding expectations and change.

This webinar is based on the School Action for Safety and Health (SASH) Program administered by the Commission on Health and Safety and Workers’ Compensation in the California Department of Industrial Relations through an interagency agreement with the Labor Occupational Health Program at the University of California, Berkeley.

Learning Objectives:

At the completion of this activity, the learner will be able to:

– Describe the body’s responses to stress in acute and chronic workplace stress
– Identify workplace factors that can create stress
– Understand the difference between reacting to stress vs. responding

Accessibility:

If you require an accommodation for effective communication (ASL interpreting/CART captioning, alternative media formats, etc.) to fully participate in this event, please contact Michelle Meyer at (510) 642-8365 or with as much advance notice as possible and at least 7-10 days in advance of the event.

UC Berkeley Labor Occupational Health Program’s School Action for Safety and Health (SASH) Program